A river, a few good friends, and a couple of dogs

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I really appreciated the last Mountainbeering adventure I went on this weekend. We weren’t on top of any mountains. We didn’t climb any multi-pitch routes. We didn’t even see any iconic landmarks. It was just a couple of friends hiking with their dogs along the Secesh River in Idaho.

In total, it was about 16 miles one way and took us six and a half hours. Here’s a really general map of the hike that I put together - Secesh River Hike, Chinook Campground to Lick Creek Rd.

Not every adventure needs to be majestic as fuck to be a good adventure. Thanks for supplying the Sockeye Dagger Falls IPA, Ben!

Ice crystals growing out of the ground. Anyone know why?

Ice crystals growing out of the ground. Anyone know why?

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Lichen!

Lichen!

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4 Responses to A river, a few good friends, and a couple of dogs

  1. Jasmine says:

    Ok, first, I would categorize the colors in those photos as majestic as fuck. Second, why ARE there ice crystals growing out of the ground? Was that a rhetorical question? Or did they not cover that in class yet?

    • Luke says:

      Ha! I don’t know why the ice crystals are growing out of the ground. It was all over the place. Long, thin crystals of ice lifting up and out of the dirt. I’m working on finding the real answer. I’ll be sure to get back to you when I find out.

    • Luke says:

      Check it out! I got an actual answer from a hydro-geologist. This was her exact response to the photo: “Lovely example of needle ice. It probably crunched when you stepped on it. Look at it carefully- it’s made up of thin ice crystals that have grown upward from about 1-2 cm under the soil surface. The moisture in the soil is brought to the surface via capillary action that results from the temp gradient between the soil 1-2 cm under the surface and the soil surface. Instead of a deposition process like surface hoar [a type of feathery looking frost], the ice grows at 90 degrees to the soil surface and in the direction of the temperature gradient which in needle ice, means towards the soil surface. I see this alot around here when it rains in late Oct or Nov, followed by cold weather.”

      Bam! You just got scienced!

  2. Pingback: A river, a few good friends, and a couple of dogs | Little Boss Man's Little Life Lessons

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